Category: server

SSD SURVIVAL

Solid State Drives have been around for a long time. NASA uses flash storage for spacecraft as it can tolerate the radiation and vibration that would trash a hard disk. The first generation of SSD for computers used a single cell per bit. Lower cost multiple cell devices expanded the market. Most recently large scale …

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VT6421A PCI SATA EIDE RAID

The VIA VT6421A controller delivers the benefits of Serial ATA and RAID in a cost effective and easily integrated single chip package, providing Serial ATA technology to enable platform providers and systems builders to satisfy the requirements of multiple market segments. This is a data card only, it does not have boot ROM capability. 2 …

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OUR SATA DISKS

SATA disks were introduced in 2005 with the Intel D915PGN desktop motherboard. SATA use 7 data pins while SAS use 14 data pins. Both use 15 power pins. The SFF-8482 connector makes it possible to connect disks to a backplane to simplify replacement. SATA DISK RELIABILITY OPERATING HOURS Remember there are 8,760 hours in a …

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SIL3114 4-PORT PCI RAID

PCI 3.3V and 5.0V universal SATA 150MB/s 4 SATA channels 266MB/s PCI bandwidth BIOS (EEPROM) RAID 0, 1, 5, 0+1, JBOD 48-bit LBA ATAPI CD/DVD/BD support Plug & Play Any machine with SATA ports on the motherboard have PCI 2.1 slots which are 32-bit and operate at 66MHz. The SIL3114 is universal and can be …

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EIA-310-D STANDARD RACKS

The EIA 310-D standard rack is 19 inches wide for servers, This has been in use for many decades as data centers galore can then use commodity machines for various purposes. EIA racks units are 1¾ inches. So generally servers are 1U, 2U or 4U however some blade boxes may be as large as 10U. …

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SSD RELIABILITY

Solid State NAND based flash drives surfaced in 1991 when Sandisk introduced a 20MB product for $1000. Since that early drive, prices have fallen considerably. NAND based SSD products have come in a rage of form factors however the focus of this study will be with SATA drives. Eventually we may add second section for …

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FIX HARD DISK CLICKING

First off you should own lots of disks so that redundant copies of important data does not get lost. This guide is not an easy solution and a disk may be wiped when repaired. The clicking sound is generally caused by a faulty logic board. Replacing the logic board requires the exact make and model disk …

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FAILED HARD DISKS

Every data center has had it fair share of disk failures. So far we have experienced very few disk failures. Clicking sounds, for example, indicate that the head is seeking back and forth and the disk does not present to the BIOS etc. We experienced 2 failures with 500GB disks arising from changes in soldering. The …

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OUR EIDE DISKS

ATA disks, later called EIDE, were introduced in 1985 with a lower cost controller board. The control logic was moved to logic board on the disk assembly which free manufacturers to design new products more easily. The 40-pin cable was eventually replaced with an 8-conductor wire to allow for higher speeds. EIDE hard disks are …

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BAD SECTORS

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In the early days of hard disks, manufacturers placed bad sector tables on the labels of the disks. This was done so that manual marking of bad sectors could be done. The image shows an old MFM  hard disk with its defect table. This was typical of early hard disks. MS-DOS formats disks completely and …

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